Tuesday, May 4, 2010

Today's poem - Metamorphosis by May Sarton


Metamorphosis
by May Sarton (May 3, 1912 - July 16, 1995)

Always it happens when we are not there -
The tree leaps up alive into the air,
Small open parasols of Chinese green
Wave on each twig. But who has ever seen
The latch sprung, the bud as it burst?
Spring always manages to get there first.

Lovers of wind, who will have been aware
Of a faint stirring in the empty air,
Look up one day through a dissolving screen
To find no star, but this multiplied green,
Shadow on shadow, singing sweet and clear.
Listen, lovers of wind, the leaves are here!

13 comments:

  1. This isn't one I'd known--but it's perfectly evocative of the season--as are your violas!

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  2. Tinky, it is in a wonderful collection I have from Beacon Press called The Language of Spring.

    http://www.beacon.org/productdetails.cfm?PC=1610

    They have such books for all seasons and I've offered quite a few of the poems on the blog over time.

    I could change my blog header every single day - there's such beauty all around!

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  3. Really beautiful. The words are as sweet and clear as the season they sing of. Thank you for sharing this!

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  4. Great and descriptive poetry!
    The leaves are not quite as far here, but soon...
    Love, love, love your header! Are they your sheep? I am sure they must be.....reminds me of the Cotswolds in England!

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  5. Nan,
    I just read your comment and know what you mean! I have the same issue...every day I want to change up my header because I've captured just'the perfect photo' so I think!
    Let me tell you, I get my inspiration from you because I know how much I enjoy your headers/variety!
    Thanks for sharing,
    Joanne

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  6. Love the new header photo! I've had mixed feelings about May Sarton. I remember Journal of a Solitude driving me crazy, but I think it had a lot to do with the time I read it - 3 kids under 5 and no patience for 'self indulgence'. Several years later, I loved A House by the Sea and have kept it on my shelf to reread. I should give her poetry a try...

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  7. Very nice. I like your header as well - it must be great fun to have sheep and critters to go outside and play with!

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  8. I just love this poem. It is so true. I have thought these very things many times. May has expressed this feeling so well. I really like your new header photo too.

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  9. Aisling, I love your new little picture! 'Clear' - Tom used that word just yesterday. He showed the poem to his students and they got it. So often poetry is obscure and unapproachable. It's great when we can read a poem and get it.

    Joanne, Thank you, and yes those are our sheep. We have six in all. You are so very kind, as always.

    JoAnn, it is a different world for people who don't have children. I used to read about Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas and think, my gosh, all that time they have! :<) I do like May Sarton so much. I listened to a great audio a while back: May Sarton, Excerpts from a Life which offers a variety of her work.

    Susan, they give us great pleasure. I wish I could publish the sound of their munching!

    Lisa, I think she is quite wonderful. Thank you.

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  10. What a wonderful poem! Thanks for sharing!

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  11. I'm so glad you liked it, Doctor Mom.

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  12. I've read several of her journals and enjoyed them. They were all written as she grew older, but she was a fascinating character in youth and age.

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  13. JenClair, I've read some but not nearly as much as I'd like.

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