Saturday, February 1, 2014

A Year of Afternoon Gardens - February


This has been an interesting month, and winter in general. We’ve had lots of cold weather with strong winds, and some milder weather, but hardly any snow. Happily for snowboarders and skiers, and for the economy, it has been plenty cold so the mountains can make snow. There have been snowstorms in much of the state, but we’ve seen hardly anything in terms of precipitation.

As I mentioned, we have some thoughts about changing some of the gardens. The one straight ahead, behind the bench, has been orange day lilies for about ten years. 


They are beautiful, but they bloom early and then that’s it for the couple months left in the summer. Last year, we dug some out and put in a few iris and aquilegia and a couple different colored day lilies, but this year we want to do even more. I saw this on Pinterest, 


and thought this is just what I want there - a variety of flowers, in different colors. There are some other spaces where we want to try some flowers too, so I bought a variety of perennial seeds that will live in our zone 3 climate. I ordered from a new-to-me company, Swallowtail Garden Seeds, and we'll start them under the grow lights.

24 comments:

  1. Oh my goodness, we have the day lilies too! Ours last most of the summer, probably because it is warmer here. The Pinterest picture is lovely but I know I could never grow all those. I'm sure it will work out for you, though. We only plant vegetables.

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  2. I have other daylilies that last longer. These are the more common ones, and they come very early and are gone around the time the other ones come out. We are thinking of cutting back on the veg and growing more flowers. There will be posts on this I expect, as the time goes on.

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  3. What a beautiful inspiration photo! I've had good luck with the combination of daisies, black-eyed Susan, and echinacea... we get color from early July into late August. I want to add Hollyhocks and Delphiniums to the mix this year.

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    1. That's encouraging. Thanks. That is just what I'm hoping for. I had such a nice year two years ago with hollyhocks, though I was picking off Japanese beetles a few times a day.

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  4. The picture from Pinterest is my favorite kind of garden - like a real English garden full of different flowers. I just love that. My dad used to have that kind of garden (well, he was a Brit, after all) and on the first day of school every year, we were sent in with a big bouquet of flowers for the teacher.

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    1. That's just how I feel. Lucky teachers!

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  5. A great combination (and great ideal picture from Pinterest) for a remake of this garden, Nan. Isn't it the perfect time of year for planning what comes next in our gardens? I trudged out in well over a foot of snow yesterday, checking the beds, from which I could see not a thing for the snow and ice, but, still . . .

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    1. Yes, we do see the flowers under all the snow, don't we?!

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  6. I love the varity of flowers.
    This is what I have tried to do in my flower bed.
    Living by the woods with damp ground
    sure is a challenge...

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  7. A month to dream of spring -- and plan for it...can't wait to see how it will look.

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    1. Aren't you nice. Love your enthusiasm.

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  8. My grandmother had some very neat beds, and her rose bushes and such. But she also had a wonderful section of garden that she called her 'cutting garden'. It was filled with a variety of flowers that bloomed throughout spring and summer, making it possible for any little children around who wanted to "make a bouquet" to do so. It was one of my favorite things to do, and I wish I could have such myself. Not enough sun or dirt on an apartment balcony, but it's time to start thinking about repotting and finding some bits of color for the season to come.

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    1. I've heard of people having cutting gardens. It's a great idea.

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  9. With six more weeks of Winter, it's nice to have a plan for Spring; what a nice selection of seeds you have. (My cats liked to sleep on the catnip plant, so it didn't last very iong, alas.)

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    1. My cats don't go out, so I pick it and dry it and then give it to them!

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  10. No matter what you'll eventually do with your gardens, I am sure it will look beautiful - and I hope we'll get to see the pictures!

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    1. Aren't you kind to want to see them!

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  11. A perfect time of year for this kind of project. Dreaming and planning...such fun. Can't wait to see your dream come true.

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    1. Thank you. Tom will be digging while I have Hazel Nina in her snugli. :<)

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  12. I love that Pinterest photo! Black-eyed Susans and Coneflowers have always been a favorite of mine. The rabbits love them, too. ;)

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    1. We have the Susans wild in the fields. But rarely a rabbit.

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  13. A promise of flowers and weather warm enough for gardening! Lovely pics!

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