Thursday, January 26, 2012

Quote du jour/Mortimer Adler




In the case of good books, the point is not to see how many of them you can get through, but rather how many can get through to you.
Mortimer J. Adler (1902-2001)

16 comments:

  1. How very, very true!! And good for my self-esteem, too - I don't think I have ever read so few books in my life than last year, ever since I learnt to read when I was 4 1/2 years old.

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  2. My feelings exactly, Nan. Excellent quote.

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  3. I love this quote and agree wholeheartedly - and thanks so much again for the wonderful headers on your blog. Your farm and your photographs are endlessly interesting as well as beautiful

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  4. He sure had a clear way of putting things, didn't he? One of my favorites is, and I'm paraphrasing, "There is something out there that it is what is, regardless of what we think it is."

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  5. So true! What is the point if the book doesn't have an effect on the reader? I will always be grateful to Adler for his role in motivating me to read the classics.

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  6. Librarian, they really are good words.

    Cath, and mine!

    Thank you, Janice, and how very nice to see you!

    Lgraves, I'd like to read something by him. I don't think I ever have.

    Stacy, so good to see you! What book did you read? I saw one with a cute cover that I was interested in - How To Read A book.

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  7. We are a not-for-profit educational organization, founded by Mortimer Adler and we have recently made an exciting discovery--three years after writing the wonderfully expanded third edition of How to Read a Book, Mortimer Adler and Charles Van Doren made a series of thirteen 14-minute videos--lively discussing the art of reading. The videos were produced by Encyclopaedia Britannica. For reasons unknown, sometime after their original publication, these videos were lost.

    Three hours with Mortimer Adler and Charles Van Doren, lively discussing the art of reading, on one DVD. A must for libraries and classroom teaching the art of reading.

    I cannot exaggerate how instructive these programs are--we are so sure that you will agree, if you are not completely satisfied, we will refund your donation.

    Please go here to see a clip and learn more:

    http://www.thegreatideas.org/HowToReadABook.htm

    ISBN: 978-1-61535-311-8

    Thank you,

    Max Weismann

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  8. Max, thanks for the information. I will check it out.

    Staci, and Jen, yes!

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  9. I appreciate reading this. People tend to be surprised to hear this, but I read relatively slowly. So when they ask me how many books I read in the past year, I know that whatever answer I give them will disappoint or seem lacking. But it isn't to me. What I do read I try my best to experience fully, even if I'm just plodding through it.

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  10. Isn't that the truth! Borrowing this for my sidebar. :)

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  11. I thought they were wonderful words, Les, and now I want to look into his work.

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  12. I have actually never read one of his books... only a book about him and how he helped to found and edit the Great Books of the Western World. My grandparents had a set that I did my first readings of the classics from and just the books themselves were such a comforting fixture from my childhood...so I am thankful for that little role he played in my reading life:)

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  13. Stacy, I've heard of the Great Books but never seen them. There was a group in town when I was in my twenties that used to meet and discuss them. I kind of wish I had been a part of that.

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