Wednesday, September 9, 2009

Library Loot/September 9




Hosted by Eva at A Striped Armchair and Marg at Reading Adventures.








I simply don't know how or why I could borrow books from the library when I am reading two right now, and am planning to read another this month for the Cornflower book group, but there you are. Four books. Four books I am exceedingly eager to read.

I read a John O'Hara story and wrote about it a while back. Since his name came up on the Mad Men booklist, I thought it would be fun to read some more by him.

I heard a 2003 interview with the late Nuala O'Faolain on Canadian radio which made me want to read her book.

I'm very much looking forward to the next-for-me Isabel Dalhousie book by Alexander McCall Smith. [note: in two libraries I've visited, his books are catalogued under 'M' not 'S.' His name is not hyphenated, so I don't understand. It is also listed this way on the fantastic fiction site.]

Years ago I read A Far Cry From Kensington, and was prompted to read it again after seeing the title on Nancy Pearl's 'Summer's Best Books' list.

Addendum: I ended up bringing them all back unread. The lesson here is to take one book out at a time from the library. I had only started one of the books, and decided to buy it: The Comforts of a Muddy Saturday.

20 comments:

  1. I heard a fascinating interview with Nuala O'Faolain on NPR several years ago and made a mental note to read the book but, of course, I haven't gotten to it yet. I'll be curious to hear what you think.

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  2. JoAnn, if you type her name into bing (my new fave search engine) a lot of interviews come up. You may find the one you heard.

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  3. Looks like a nice little pile! That is odd about Alexander McCall Smith's name, though.

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  4. I sure thought so, Eva! Would Ralph Waldo Emerson be filed under W? Or Henry David Thoreau under D? Weird.

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  5. Nan, let us know how you get on with Muriel Spark. I see that novel has been re-issued as a Virago Modern Classic, too. I've only read The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie which I found quite a difficult read.

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  6. Vintage Reader, it has been a long time since I picked up The Prime... and I am quite sure I never really finished. The movie was upsetting enough. :<) But this one, I remember fondly. We'll see how true the memory is if I get around to reading it.

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  7. I came to A Far Cry From Kensington through Nancy Pearl as well. But it was from her fabulous book "Book Lust". Until that point I had had only ever read The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie. Since I took Pearl's advice, I have read probably 10 or so of sparks books and find them always quirky and interesting.

    And if you haven't looked at Pearl's "Book Lust" you really should. It opened me up to a lot of great books. Plus a book of book lists, how could that not be good?

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  8. Oh, Thomas, thank you! You know, I've seen the book title, but have never picked it up. I'll remedy that.

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  9. McCall Smith causes problems over here as well. For some reason one of our main bookshops puts it under M while the other uses the nmore correct S. Perhaps Agatha Christie has found her way to the A.s...

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  10. No kidding! That makes me feel a little better - that it isn't just the Americans who are doing it. Well, it is true that fantastic fiction is a uk site. But you guys know all about hyphenated names, and they are still pretty new and uncommon over here. Still, shouldn't everyone know? see my comment to Eva above. :<)

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  11. Thanks, Nan! I always love your book recommendations (although my list is getting rather out of control)! I'm finishing up Thirteen Moons by Charles Frazier and then plan to pick something off your list next.

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  12. Alison, what a nice thing to say. Is Frazier the fellow who wrote that long book, which name I can't recall. About the civil war???

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  13. Yes, Cold Mountain. I haven't read it, but am very much enjoying Thirteen Moons - I think you'd like it too.:)

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  14. I was just thinking about A Far Cry from Kensington the other day - of course, I was thinking about it in the most shallow way, debating following diet plan! But besides that, a wonderful book.

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  15. Alison, I'll keep it in mind!

    Susan, I'm laughing because the single thing I remember about the book is the woman losing weight by eating half of what she would have. :<) Amazing.

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  16. I read a book by Nuala O'Faolain a few years ago. I mostly liked it, but wasn't inspired to pick up more really.

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  17. Maybe she said all she needed to in one book, Marg??

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  18. I read Are you Somebody? A few years back. Very good book. I hope you enjoy it!

    I've been meaning to come here for a little while now - I'm glad I made it (Raidergirl 3 finally got me here! from her post today).

    and I've seen McCall Smith under both M and S, here in Canada! Kind of like Charles de Lint, I've found him under both d and l too.

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  19. We shelve Alexander McCall Smith's books under "S" at B&N. However, the occasional employee (or customer?) will stick one of his books in the M section. Drives. Me. Crazy! :)

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  20. Susan, thanks so much for coming by. I hope I get to even begin the O'F. book! I just found out I have an ILL waiting for me at the library, and I'm reading a 300 page book now, and well, you know how that goes!

    Les. me. too!!

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Now that I am a grandmother, it seems that I am often late in replying to your most-appreciated comments. But I read them as soon as they come in, and I will write as soon as I can. Please do come back and check. I love these blogging conversations. A little addendum - I've just spent quite a long time catching up with dear notes you left me months ago!! I do hope you can get back to read them. And I'm trying to be much more prompt now!

Also, you may comment on any post, no matter how old, and I will see it.