Sunday, March 22, 2009

Product placement/pudding

When I was a little girl my mother used to make chocolate pudding from scratch. This 'store-bought' pudding is the closest I've ever tasted. There are many different varieties if chocolate isn't your favorite. A real plus for me is that the farm has a humane certification. You may read more about it here, and if interested may find out if it is available on your store shelves. They also offer mail order shipping to several states.




17 comments:

  1. Yum - looks so creamy! Fingers crossed they have it here in America's Dairyland!

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  2. Mmmm. Chocolate pudding is my favorite. It has to be cooked and be allowed to develop the skin that forms while cooling. No plastic wrap skin preventer for me! I'll have to see if it is available in Georgia. It looks positively delicious. :)

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  3. I LOVE chocolate pudding! I mean....LOVE LOVE chocolate pudding. Alas, I don't think we have this brand here. Siiiigh.

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  4. That doesn't look remotely like a chocolate pud to me, here in the UK. It looks more like chocolate blancmange. To me a chocolate pudding is a steamed sponge chocolate pudding, nothing like something you tip into a bowl. You eat it hot, too, not cold.
    Margaret Powling
    PS But no doubt your version of choc pud is delicious, all the same!

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  5. Yum! It doesn't look like it's sold here.

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  6. Colleen, it is! I occasionally eat the tapioca and butterscotch, too.

    Hip Chick, I'm sure you will be able to find it in your supermarket. It is out-of-this-world delicious.

    Alison, the website will let you know. Hope you can get it.

    Karin, honestly, it is better than anything I can make. My chocolate mousse is terrific, but really very different in taste and texture.

    Kay, sorry. Maybe someday it will be. Ben & Jerry's started off very local, and grew so maybe these folks' pudding will as well.

    Margaret, I can't even imagine what a 'steamed sponge' is. I think the word is used very differently over there. Ol' Rumpole is always going on about his steak and kidney pud. :<)

    Tara, sorry. See what I wrote above to Kay. Hope their fame spreads!

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  7. A steamed pud: you make a sponge mixture, which is fat (butter or margarine) 'creamed' with sugar, to which you add eggs and then self-raising flour, and put you put that into a basin, cover it with greaseproof paper and/or foil and put it in a steamer and steam it until cooked. You can add other things to it, such as cocoa for a choc pud, or fruit at the bottom, for a fruit pud.
    A steak and kidney pud is done with suet pastry, and you then line a pudding basin with the suet (rendered down beef fat) pastry, add the meat and some stock, put a pastry lid on the top so as to seal the meat into the pastry, then add greaseproof paper and/or foil and pop in a steamer - voila! Steaming takes quite a long time, longer than if you put the pie in the oven. They are light and delicious, and when we serve the sponge puds (sweet puds, I mean) we usually serve with custard or a chocolate or jam sauce. Our 'puds' are nothing like the pudding you showed in the photograph. As I say, that looks like chocolate blancmange to me, or even a chocolate yoghurt.
    Margaret Powling

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  8. I love their packaging!! I would be excited if I could find that on my grocery shelves!

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  9. Margaret, a great example of the differences in language. Thanks so much for taking the time to write this all out. Not only is it completely new to me, I don't even know what a steamer is. :<)

    Staci, I hope it is available. All natural ingredients too.

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  10. A steamer ... they're wonderful. It's what I use to cook veg in. It's a double saucepan, and the top one has holes in it's bottom, if you'll excuse the expression. Into the bottom one you put water and into the top one you can put anything you want to cook by steam rather than boiling in water. It's an excellent way of cooking veg which go to mush if they're cooked in water, i.e. spinach. You can put a pud in the top and steam it rather than baking it in an oven. My steamer has two top containers, which stack, and you can always use the bottom part (with the water) to cook something else if you wish, so you can cook three different things at once on the one gas ring or electric ring. If I knew where I could email you, I would send you a photograph of my steamer in action sometime!

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  11. It sounds a little like what I call a 'double-boiler,' Margaret, except there are no holes. And then I have a little collapsible gizmo called a 'steamer' which is full of holes and goes over the top of a saucepan which is used for vegetables. So it sounds like yours is a combination of these two things. I might add an email to my blog. :<)

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  12. I know the collapsable steamers you can add to a saucepan, but I don't have one. At Christmas, when there are so many things to cook on the hob I double up the steaming capacity with parts of another steamer ... it's a very inexpensive way to cook as you can cook all your veg on one ring (gas or electric.) Yes, an email would be lovely, so long as you could weed out those from undesirables (not that undesirables would be reading Letters from a Hill Farm!)
    We can also get double-boilers in this country although I don't have one. My Mum (note we call mother Mum over here, not Mom, unless you come from the Midlands where they call mother Mom, too!) used one for making porridge (i.e. water in the bottom pan, porridge in the top pan.) Not sure whether you eat porridge in the USA? I use porridge oats and mix them with milk, one part oats to two parts milk, bring to the boil, stirring all the time, and cooking for around 5 minutes. I serve this with golden granulated sugar for Himself and golden syrup (NOT maple syrup) for me! Truly yummy!!!

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  13. Margaret, I created an email for the blog, and it's on the sidebar! So send me those pics. I make oatmeal, but no milk, barely cooked, and I put honey in it. What is golden syrup?

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  14. Golden syrup was invented in the late 1880s. A thick, runny substance was a by-product of the sugar refining process and the Lyle company (for over here most golden syrup is produced by the Lyle company - see www.lylesgoldensyrup.com) decided that this by-product could be used as a sweetener and preservative. It doesn't come from trees, as does maple syrup. It is very sweet and golden in colour and delicious on porridge (made with milk.)
    I will take some pix of the steamer in due course, and send them to you via your email.
    Rain over here, but not cold. 10C (which is around 50F I think.)
    Margaret Powling

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  15. Margaret, first of all, the email address is to be found by clicking the view my profile, not right on the front page. Thanks for syrup info. Since we have maple syrup all around us, that's all I ever use. Same temp here as there!

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