Tuesday, March 31, 2009

Book Travels - March 2009

My March reading began in New York City with Elizabeth Enright's Melendy family, and went on to Trenton Lee Stewart's fictional Stonetown Harbor area. Then I traveled across the Atlantic to London and Kent for two visits with Jacqueline Winspear's Maisie Dobbs; and stayed in England with Hazel Holt's Mrs. Malory in Oxford, and with Raffaella Barker's characters in Norfolk. Then I came back to stay with the Melendys again, this time in their country house outside of New York City. I ended the month in British Columbia, Canada with Vicki Delany's Molly Smith.

This is pretty much the same journey I take every month. I'm like one of those business people that has branches in both the US and England, with an occasional foray into Canada to maybe begin a new division.

The time span this month was 1941-2009.

8 comments:

  1. I can't decide if your blog is good for me, or not. Every post you write about books introduces me to new authors--now it's Hazel Holt! And Vicki Delany! My Shelfari list of books I plan to read has never been so long and my weekly trips to the library keep me smiling.

    Thank you for everything you've been writing. Perhaps some time you might write a post about how you find your own ideas for books to read...

    ReplyDelete
  2. Your first sentence makes me laugh, Clair. :<)
    That's an interesting idea for a blog post, but I'm not sure I know the answer! Mostly from reading articles over the years or now blogs I'd guess. Thank you for all your nice comments. I apppreciate you coming by and taking the time to write.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I am catching up on your blog as I have not had time to read any for ages. Isn't it wonderful that you can travel the world from your armchair or your bed with a book?

    ReplyDelete
  4. Cait, it sure is! It gives me the chance to get over your way without having to spend any money or leave my dogs. :<)

    ReplyDelete
  5. I love the Melendy stories. I read them as a child and was fascinated by the depiction of New York in The Saturdays. I recently bought all four of them and re-read them will utter delight all over again, this time with my love of Wagner to the fore when I realised that Rush went to the Met to see the Ring which I did not understand at the time. When my copies arrived they still had the same wonderful illustrations inside that I remembered. Happy days!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Elaine, that's so great! I had never heard of them until I bought them for my children. I haven't kept all their childhood books, but I knew I would want to read these again. Speaking of Wagner, you must get a kick out of the names of the Erskine-Brown children's names in Mortimer's books. :<)

    ReplyDelete
  7. I read _The Four Story Mistake_ (of Melendy fame)when I was 9 or 10. I loved it - and while I remembered many details, particularly the cupola and the hidden room, I forgot the title of the book. When the internet made it possible to google any odd-bit, I googled some combination of words I could remember from the book and found it again! I bought an ex-library copy just like the one I read as a kid for my daughter. She wasn't that interested, but I reread it and realized how it had colored my idea of what a great childhood should be (as a child). I was thwarted in suburbia! I wanted the romance of the Melendy's. I still do. I am not surprised to find you are also a fan.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Ksvw, your country life now is very like the Melendy's!

    ReplyDelete

Now that I am a grandmother, it seems that I am often late in replying to your most-appreciated comments. But I read them as soon as they come in, and I will write as soon as I can. Please do come back and check. I love these blogging conversations. A little addendum - I've just spent quite a long time catching up with dear notes you left me months ago!! I do hope you can get back to read them. And I'm trying to be much more prompt now!

Also, you may comment on any post, no matter how old, and I will see it.